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BTT: Celebrity Memoirs: Yum or Yuck?

July 2, 2009
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Do you read celebrity memoirs? Which ones have you read or do you want to read? Which nonexistent celebrity memoirs would you like to see?

As a recovering political science major, I have countless (not an expression) biographies of generals, politicians, explorers, revolutionaries, teachers and doctors. I even have a few autobiographies; Maddie Albright and President Obama, I am looking at you.

I am not, though, generally, a fan of the celebrity memoir.  I think, at this point, I’m going to blame my visceral aversion to the genre on the ridiculous rants of John Malkovich in Burn After Reading.

The Cohen brothers aside, I think that it really has something to do with the open-faced format in which we now view celebrities. By the time Brittany or Jessica or Jeter get their stories to the shelves, the press has already let us in on their deepest darkest secrets by way of page six. Although, in mention of Jeter, I will say that, even as a Red Sox fan, I read Torre’s book and rather enjoyed it. (I think that the negative factors of celebrity memoir and a book completely dedicated to the Yankees canceled itself out.)

As far as what I would read, Oprah has been tossed around a fair amount by other BTT’ers and I whole heartedly agree. Aside from that, I think I’ll stick to generals and USWeekly for my biographical information.

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12 Comments leave one →
  1. July 2, 2009 11:47 am

    My favorite celebrity memoir has to be “Bad as I Want to Be.” The story of Danny Bonaduce.
    So good.

  2. July 2, 2009 12:48 pm

    I find political memoirs quite interesting although I haven’t read a lot. Celebrities, not so much.

  3. July 2, 2009 1:37 pm

    Poets, authors..memoirs of these people I can read! And gladly!

    Mostly I read memoirs of real people!

    Here is my BTT post!

  4. July 2, 2009 4:13 pm

    I might read Oprah’s memoir and since reading your other comments, Danny Bonaduce would probably be an interesting one, but too potty for me, his book is titled Random Acts of Badness though, not Bad as I Want To Be, that’s Dennis Rodman’s book.

  5. iwriteinbooks permalink*
    July 2, 2009 4:14 pm

    I’m with you Shari and Guatami!

    Andrea, that sounds fantastically awful. Have to love Danny.

  6. iwriteinbooks permalink*
    July 2, 2009 4:19 pm

    Thanks for the edit, Vicki. I had no idea either one existed until now. very moment is truly a learning experience. 😉

  7. July 2, 2009 7:02 pm

    If it’s all about glitz and glamor and bio-facts, I’ve got better things to read. If the person has something to really say and share of interest, then okay. Meat Loaf’s is funny and gives insight into the music industry and how it’s changed since the early 80’s.

  8. Mollie permalink
    July 2, 2009 11:38 pm

    I read Tim Allens book, “Don’t stand to close to a naked man” when I was like eleven and I loved it. I also read Jenna Jemisons book, I did not like it as much.

  9. Amanda permalink
    July 3, 2009 1:31 am

    I sorta maybe someday want to read Hillary and Bill Clinton’s books. But those are probably more political than celebrity. I hear Tori Spelling’s books are pretty good, and she also talks about raising her kids in them.

  10. Schatzi permalink
    July 4, 2009 1:23 am

    Yes, a celebrity would have to be pretty remarkable for me to want to read their memoirs, and most people labeled as celebrities just aren’t that remarkable.

  11. Kate Henley Long permalink
    July 30, 2009 11:20 pm

    Pam, I’m totally late to this thread but having just seen RENT four (yes, four) times in the last couple of weeks with Anthony Rapp and Adam Pascal, I’m reminded of how much I *loved* reading Anthony Rapp’s memoir, Without You. I think it helps caring a lot about the person and their life/work, with the whole celebrity memoir thing, but this is one that I would definitely recommend to any RENT fan 😉

  12. July 31, 2009 10:04 am

    Because it’s also about love and loss among family and friends, Without You is easy to relate with and truly personal. It was a wonderfully beautiful read.

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